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What are the most suitable research philosophies in academic research? Show more Show less

The term research philosophy refers to a system of beliefs and assumptions about the development of knowledge. In layman’s terms, a research philosophy is the choice a researcher makes on how to pursue his research, consciously or subconsciously. Scholars have identified five of the most prominent research philosophies in academia, however, choosing one is a matter of debate. (main source: Saunders, Mark & Lewis, P & Thornhill, A. (2009). Understanding research philosophies and approaches. Research Methods for Business Students. 4. 106-135.)
Supporters of critical realism claim that reality is much more than our senses allow us to see, preferring to focus on the bigger picture.
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Strives for objectivity

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Context

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The Argument

Critical realists acknowledge that bias and prejudice exists, however they strive to do away with it, attempting to be as objective as possible. This is a useful exercise especially when it comes to investigating the past or other cultures, as it allows the researchers to understand the people or social groups under investigation and formulate credible theories and arguments about the research subject without being burdened by their own preconceptions and bias.

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This page was last edited on Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 01:14 UTC